Massage Therapy Treatments

From Relaxation to Injury Recovery

MASSAGE THERAPY

Massage Therapy has been used for thousands of years to relieve and heal uncomfortable conditions. In recent history research has shown massages don’t just feel good, they really do initiate and cause healing at a deep cellular level.

Massage therapy is believed to work because of the complex way your brain processes and responds to the sensation of touch. Different massage techniques gain your brain’s attention in different ways, eliciting different healing responses.

All massage sessions are completely customizable, from more or less pressure, to various techniques or the inclusion of stretching or heat – what your body needs to initiate healing will be unique to you and your session should reflect that.

Techniques practiced in this office are: Swedish (relaxing), deep tissue, myofascial release, sports, trigger point, prenatal and craniosacral therapy.

Massage Therapy

WHAT IT IS

Massage therapy is the term for the manipulation of soft tissue in the pursuit of improving wellness. There are many techniques within massage, some involving applying oil to the skin in long gliding motions (Swedish or Relaxation massage) while others involve long stained pressure with intention to stretch or release underlying tissues (Myofascial Release or Trigger Point Therapy). The key to an effective massage session is to communicate with your therapist. From adjustments in pressure, to the speed of the work or ques about how the technique feels can help your therapist customize a session that truly leaves you feeling your best.

Communication is the key to a great session because massage therapy is a subjective experience. Massage is actually affecting the brain and not the muscle or connective tissue. Your brain is aware when someone is touching you, even when your sleeping, so during a massage your brain is consistently responding and adjusting to the contact. For physical touch to impact muscles or connective tissue (versus the brain) it would take over 400lbs/sq inch, to create a change. Since this much pressure would most definitely cause injury, we can conclude massage doesn’t work because of the amount of pressure (through the amount of pressure should be enough to feel good!), it works by gaining your brain’s attention where your brain then responds.

Just like two people’s taste buds are different, so are pressure and touch receptors. Our brain is always working to keep our body in optimal function, from heart rate and blood pressure to temperature and hormone excretion. Our brain is constantly analyzing our surroundings and striving to protect us from danger by interpreting and respond to our senses (like temperature control or knowing to avoid your boss when you hear him yelling on the phone). Our brain learns from our experiences then recalls them to continually keep your safe and out of harm’s way. Your experiences are unique to you, making how your brain responds to touch equally as unique. The person on the table before you might enjoyed what they thought was light pressure, while the same pressure feels very deep and painful to you.

Using so much pressure that it hurts doesn’t help you resolve pain faster, it just encourages your brain to send protective contractions to the painful site. But what about when it hurts and feels good? Some sessions might have a “hurt-so-good” sensation, which we call useful pain and is different than ouchy pain. Ouchy pain (my very technical description of bad pain) is the type of pressure or touch that you move away from, or takes your breath away. This type of discomfort during a massage session doesn’t elicit the healing response and isn’t useful. Even light or relaxing massages engage the brain’s response system meaning these sessions are considered therapeutic and benefit your health as much as “deep tissue” sessions can.

If you experience discomfort during any massage session, alert your practitioner. Steps can be taken to help you enjoy your experience and truly aid wellness. All massage sessions are completely customizable, from more or less pressure, to various techniques or the inclusion of stretching or heat – what your body needs to initiate healing will be unique to you and your session should reflect that. You should always tell your therapist if something they’re doing is creating discomfort or isn’t yielding the result you hoped for.

ROLFING THERAPY

Massage therapy is the term for the manipulation of soft tissue in the pursuit of improving wellness. There are many techniques within massage, some involving applying oil to the skin in long gliding motions (Swedish or Relaxation massage) while others involve long stained pressure with intention to stretch or release underlying tissues (Myofascial Release or Trigger Point Therapy). The key to an effective massage session is to communicate with your therapist. From adjustments in pressure, to the speed of the work or ques about how the technique feels can help your therapist customize a session that truly leaves you feeling your best.

Communication is the key to a great session because massage therapy is a subjective experience. Massage is actually affecting the brain and not the muscle or connective tissue. Your brain is aware when someone is touching you, even when your sleeping, so during a massage your brain is consistently responding and adjusting to the contact. For physical touch to impact muscles or connective tissue (versus the brain) it would take over 400lbs/sq inch, to create a change. Since this much pressure would most definitely cause injury, we can conclude massage doesn’t work because of the amount of pressure (through the amount of pressure should be enough to feel good!), it works by gaining your brain’s attention where your brain then responds.

Just like two people’s taste buds are different, so are pressure and touch receptors. Our brain is always working to keep our body in optimal function, from heart rate and blood pressure to temperature and hormone excretion. Our brain is constantly analyzing our surroundings and striving to protect us from danger by interpreting and respond to our senses (like temperature control or knowing to avoid your boss when you hear him yelling on the phone). Our brain learns from our experiences then recalls them to continually keep your safe and out of harm’s way. Your experiences are unique to you, making how your brain responds to touch equally as unique. The person on the table before you might enjoyed what they thought was light pressure, while the same pressure feels very deep and painful to you.

Using so much pressure that it hurts doesn’t help you resolve pain faster, it just encourages your brain to send protective contractions to the painful site. But what about when it hurts and feels good? Some sessions might have a “hurt-so-good” sensation, which we call useful pain and is different than ouchy pain. Ouchy pain (my very technical description of bad pain) is the type of pressure or touch that you move away from, or takes your breath away. This type of discomfort during a massage session doesn’t elicit the healing response and isn’t useful. Even light or relaxing massages engage the brain’s response system meaning these sessions are considered therapeutic and benefit your health as much as “deep tissue” sessions can.

If you experience discomfort during any massage session, alert your practitioner. Steps can be taken to help you enjoy your experience and truly aid wellness. All massage sessions are completely customizable, from more or less pressure, to various techniques or the inclusion of stretching or heat – what your body needs to initiate healing will be unique to you and your session should reflect that. You should always tell your therapist if something they’re doing is creating discomfort or isn’t yielding the result you hoped for.

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